free web hosting | website hosting | Business Hosting | Free Website Submission | shopping cart | php hosting

Cultural Diversities East and West: Postcommunism, Postcolonialism and Ethnicity

Central European University, 22 July-2 August 2002

Fellow profile

Vsem privet !
Name

Marina VADEICHA

The friends call me... Masha
Country RUSSIA
Residence  
Nationality  
Sex Female
Age 45
Zodiac Taurus
Educational background B.A. in Russian History and Traditional Culture, St. Petersburg State University, (1995).
M.A. in Cultural Anthropology, History and Theory of Culture, European University at St. Petersburg (2000)
Present position PhD student
Administrator

Was editor and book designer at Spetsialnaya Literature Publishers.

Employer European University of St Petersburg
Research interests Post Soviet studies. Urban ethnography. Russian diaspora. Russsian identity. "The Other Russians". Imperial Russian history.
Current research Work on the project "The Other Russians, or Mobilised Mentality", devoted to the study of the Russians coming back to Russian Federation from the former Soviet republics.
Conferences, seminars...
  • 2001, Febr.  St. Petersburg  Conference 'Mythology and Everyday Life', Institute of Russian Literature and Art  paper: "The Image of a 'False' Tsar is Historic Song: to the Constructing of the Orthoxdox Identity".
  • 2000, Nov.  St. Petersburg  International Conference 'Workshop on Field Methods in Social Sciences", European University at St. Petersburg  paper: "Ethnographical Questionnaire: the Problem of the Source Research."
  • 2002, Febr.  St. Petersburg  Conference 'Mythology and Everyday Life', Institute of Russian Literature and Art  paper: "Patronal Festival as Instrument of Village Identity: Gender aspects".
  • 2001, July  Budapest, Hungary  SUN Course "Religious Identity and Religious Syncretism", CEU   paper: "Russian Bath: Ancient pert and Orthodox banya".
Professional affiliation  
Publications
  • 1. "Bells and Bell Chime in Traditional Slavonic Culture" // Problems ofSocial and Humanitarian Knowledge: Collection of Scientific Works. SPb.,1999. Part 1.
  • 2. "The legend of Apostle Andrew's Coming to Russia: Mockery or Argumentin Discussion?" //Bulletin of Young Scholars. 2000. ? 8.
  • 3. "Drama of Bath (to Constructing the Image of the "False" Tsar inHistorical Song)" //Works of the Department of Ethnology / EuropeanUniversity at St.Petersburg. SPb., 2001. Part 1.
  • 4. "Russian Bath in Folklore: Ideal man in Ideal World" //Anthropology, Folklore, Linguistics. SPb., 2001. Part 1.
  • 5. "A Village Festival: Distribution of Social Roles" // Mythology andEveryday Life. Materials of Conference. SPb., 2001. Part 4.
  • 6. "Russian bath: Old Russian pert' and Christian banya in traditional culture" (in print; accepted for publication by Central European University).
  • 7. "A Patronal Fest: Aspects of Traditional Culture" (in print; accepted for publication by European University at St.Petersburg).
  • 8. "Russians in Soviet Republics: Crisis of Identity", accepted for publication by European University at St. Petersburg).
  • 9. "Migrants' Nets in Vyborg Disrict of Leningrad Region. Newcomers formBaku and Kokand" (in: Other Russians or mobilized mentality. Workingmaterials. Book 2". SPb, 2002).
  • 10. "Russian Specialist in the Post-Soviet East: Failure of Imperial Ambitions. Case study" ( (in: Other Russians or mobilized mentality. Workingmaterials. Book 2". SPb, 2002).
Excerpts from publications 1. Russians in Soviet Republics: Crisis of Identity

The article is devoted to Russian-speaking migrants from Middle Asia (Uzbekistan) and Caucasus (Baku) now living in Vyborg district of Leningrad region. It is based on the author's field materials gathered in summer 2001. Most of informants are specialists with high education who had worked in different spheres of Soviet economy and education. After the split of the USSR they had to remove from former republics to Russia owing to intolerable attitude to Russians and Russian language in newly formed national states. Returning back to Russia was caused by expectations of our informants to meet compatriots, "real" Russians who would be more friendly than native people in their former places of life. Having come to Russia they suddenly found themselves more "alien" than they felt at home. "Other Russians" now feel great difficulty with defining their national identity because in Soviet time they used to imagine themselves "Soviets", citizens of the whole USSR, and it was no matter what very nation they belonged to. Now, after about 10 years they have lived in Vyborg district they still feel strangers, and do not aim at assimilation with "Russian" Russians.

2. Migrants' Nets in Vyborg Disrict of Leningrad Region. Newcomers form Baku and Kokand.

The article is devoted to Russian-speaking migrants from Middle Asia and Caucasus now living in Vyborg district of Leningrad region. It is based on the author's field materials gathered in summer 2001. During work the field, we found that newcomers from Kokand (Uzbekistan) and Baku (Azerbaijan) are organized in informal "nets", each of these having some special features. Kokanders all came to Vyborg "in a line", owing to neighbors' help and support, and their contacts last from their life in Uzbekistan. As to the citizens of Baku, they have came to the place by their own contacts, each family having some friends who had helped them to settle down and find job. Their contacts with other comers from Baku began already after coming to Vyborg district. Representatives of both "nets" are acquainted but they exist apart of each other and of "local" Russians. As a whole, comers from Middle Asia and Caucasus seem more successful with their career than "local" people. Their points of pride are their "professionalism, responsible attitude to labor, high moral qualities" which they ascribe to their "Asian" neighbors' influence.

1. Russian Specialist in the Post-Soviet East: Failure of Imperial Ambitions. Case study.

The publication presents one interview with comments. The informant is now retired, during Soviet time had been a director of the prestige Russian secondary school in Baku, party functioner, with very strong communist and imperial convictions. He shows an excellent example of a "Soviet" Russian who still believes in "internationalism", "friendship of nations" that existed in the USSR and "intrigues of American imperialists" which broke the Soviet paradise.
Case study for the summer course The "other Russians",   the former Soviet experience and failure of expectations about compatriots in "big motherland".
Statement of interest My intent connected with this course is to acquaint with current studies concerning identity, integration and other problems of migrants from liberated colonies (I mean representatives of mother nation). According to my research Russians coming back from "colonies" (former "national" republics) feel disappointment and embarrassment having found themselves very different from citizens of Russia. The process of integration is painful and difficult. Their habits seem strange and "Asiatic" to Russians, they are not welcome in Russia.Their imperial consciousness makes them haughty with their "cultural mission" among ignorant indigenes and they look with neglect upon their compatriots whom they find in Russia now. Often they feel that their former countrymen, Uzbek or Azerbaijan people whom they used to consider "alien" understand them better that Russians. I would be glad to know more about world experience of studies about former "colonizers" (occupants) in newly established states, former colonies.
Personal message  
Plans for the future To teach a course on Ethnic History of the Russians and Imperial History of Russia.

In the future, it is planned to organize a new trend of research at the Department of Ethnology, that is, Russian Ethnci History, Imperial History of Russia, Post-Soviet Studies, where I am going to teach the course "Imperial History of Russia".

Foodfest suggestions
The best thing would be kurnik, North Russian wedding pie with chicken, eggs and mushrooms, it is very delicious and beautiful looking (also it contains flour, sour cream, rise, butter). But I wonder if I am permitted to bring food with me. Or are ingredients available to bye in Budapest? If not I can make a Russian pirog (pie) with any filling we can afford - meat, fish, fruit, cabbage...

Also good would be borshch (soup with red beet), cold or hot (meat, red beet, cabbage, potato, carrot, sour cream, parsley, tomato, paprica), or bliny (pancakes) with traditional filling (sour cream, butter, salt fish, caviar...). Anything of these tastes good.

Hobbies Folk culture and ethnography, cooking (and books about), folk embroidery, books about traditional crafts, fine and folk arts, detective stories.
Thanks for visiting my webpage! Spasibo, chto posetili moyu stranitsy (moi sait) !
See you soon in Budapest! Uvidimsya v Budapeshte !
Contact E-mail to: lahta@eu.spb.ru

 Now, please add more information about yourself by filling in this form.

Previous: Justyna Straczuk .
Next: Farah Wardani .Back to fellows' list.